Spirit of EQ – How EQ Can Change Your Life



Eric Pennington
Hello, everyone. This is Eric Pennington with the spirit of EQ. And welcome to the spirit of EQ podcast.

Today’s episode is how EQ can change your life. Joining me as always, is Jeff East with the spirit of EQ. Hi, Jeff,

Jeff East
how are you? Hi, Eric and all our listeners. So Eric, how can EQ change your life? So, where did that come from?

Eric Pennington
Well, you know, Jeff, we always try to come up with great titles. And I’m not going to tell you that this is the best title ever came up with. But having said that, I’ve really been thinking a lot about that the true measure of emotional intelligence is you being able to say that it really changed how I live my life, because there’s so much in it and there’s so much power in it. And I thought that it’d be great as we’re looking at a new year, actually new decade.

Eric Pennington
Yeah. You know, being 2020, we, it’s a great time to start thinking about what are the practical here? What’s, how can it really change anything? Because I have a feeling to that there are a number of people out there, Jeff, who are their way down with a ton of stuff coming at them. And I’ve always believed that the work that we do is designed to be of help to be a value.

Jeff East
You know, I agree. That’s, that’s one of the big reasons we do it. Yeah, yes. You know, we’ve seen what it’s done for us and we don’t want to, you know, hide that.

Eric Pennington
Yeah, ourselves. You know, I’ve almost even likened it too, you know, I told this is a long time ago, he was a physician. And I said, you know, if people knew just how much I wanted to help them, they’d be lining up, like around the block because

Jeff East
it is a new year, new decade. So this is the time to maybe make these decisions.

Eric Pennington
Yeah, you know, the essence of our work, right. The sort of the definition of emotional intelligence is the blending of thinking and emotions. Make optimal decisions. I’ve kind of liken You know, my term has been more like managing my thoughts and my emotions to make better decisions. And you know, most people out there have either started or maybe they started, you know, back in December, maybe they’re in the process of doing it now of setting the resolutions, and also goals of what they want 2020 to be like, and that implies decisions and choices. You know, the, the reality is this. This is another saying that has always stuck with me that 90% of your life will be, what choices you made, what decisions you made, exactly. 10% of your life will be the stuff that you could never see coming. Maybe we call that lucky or unlucky. But if 90% of my life is in my hands based on my decisions, as daunting as that sounds,

Eric
Jeff, it really does imply that there’s an opportunity there. And I think to me, what you’re saying is

Jeff East
Learning how to make those decisions is going to be the foundation or the bedrock of what kind of a life you’re going to end up having.

Eric Pennington
Yeah. And and Jeff, you know, whether I like it or not, you mean our producer, Brett? Our lives 90% of it is based on what I decided to do, whether that was yesterday or 20 years ago. I know

Jeff East
you and I did a training about decisions and it’s just how many thousands of decisions we make a day. And we don’t look at what can happen after that. So I think that that’s a very important thing to remember. You know, what debase your life and I get

Eric Pennington
it, when things are coming at you. It you know, the number of decisions we’re making each day and I truly and I understand, sometimes it’s frivolous. Sometimes it’s it’s unnecessary time wasting garbage, right. But on the whole and there is something to be said about being very conscious. Just about your decision making. And I’ve with my own experience in my own life, emotional intelligence has been a very large part. And how I make decisions. I mean it is it’s truth.

Jeff East
I’m intrigued here you have the review of the four.

Eric Pennington
Well, I don’t want anyone out there to be confused as to think I’m going to talk about the four horsemen or something. I said that Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, I think that’s what it was,

Jeff East
like something with Notre Dame football.

Eric Pennington
Yeah, football apocalypse, it’s all the same. So we as you know, I look at the Western world and specific in the United States, we’re, we’re, we’re really good at picking and choosing what we want to focus on. And, and though at times that can be positive, it oftentimes can be negative because we pay attention, one at the expense of the other. So the four here and I’ll wrap them a little bit here in a second. The physical life, the spiritual life, the mental life and the emotional life. Okay? Some of that leaps right out for our listeners, when I talk about money I mentioned emotional.

Eric Pennington
But for these areas in order for us to be healthy then they need to be paid attention to. And it’s my hope like today, maybe we can be a catalyst that maybe somebody is going to say, Hey, I get this idea making better decisions. Well, what kind of better decisions can I make with these for?

Eric Pennington
Now the physical is really, really straightforward. It’s your body, okay? It’s what you’re doing with or to your body, right? So we think of exercise we think of what foods we eat. We think of our relationship maybe with our doctors as it relates to health and, and for people like me with a chronic disease. I mean, taking care of that. And here’s the thing I want to I want to be clear, there’s a right motivation and a wrong motivation in all of these. The physical one is a lot of time When we start talking about weight loss and exercise, it can get really kind of foggy convoluted, right? Because please hear me and understand, I am not talking about, you need to lose 30 pounds so that you’re going to look great in that dress or that suit or what have you.

Jeff East
Okay. In my mind, that should be a byproduct of focusing on being healthy. You know, when you said that I was thinking of a friend who, who lost a lot of weight, and nobody noticed. And they were losing it before the appearance thing. And that actually, when nobody noticed that they’d lost this weight. They gained it all back.

Eric Pennington
Yeah, that that’s understandable. And I know there’s there’s statistics out there that show about how many people do regain weight. And I think motivation and the decision Why did you make that decision to lose weight in this case? Really, really will probably give you a good indicator whether or not it’s going to last right. But I believe in small steps, Jeff. And I think that’s the beauty of where decision making can really help you just start something, just do something, just be more proactive about something, it doesn’t have to be. I’ve got to be able to run a seven minute mile and a half marathon in five months. That’s not what I’m talking about. I’m talking about just doing something being kind to your body, taking care of yourself being healthy, because it is going to impact again, your ability to make really good decisions. There’s science out there that talks about the impact of how our physical well being impacts the others.

Jeff East
Well it’s for one of a better way of saying it. The reason we put surge protectors and things to plug your computers in is we need to make sure they’re running right in the physical if you’re putting these bad things into your body. One way or the other? It’s not going to run, right?

Eric Pennington
Yeah, I mean in to that point, right? You mean is this idea that if I choose to eat this particular type of food, how is it going to make my physical life better? Or is it going to make it worse? I understand the temptation. If you said to me, we’re going to go and have a cheeseburger fries and a Diet Coke. I’m in because I’d like the taste of it. And Jeff, there’s nothing wrong with doing that every so often. Don’t get me wrong. But Jeff, the problem arises when I let that I love that taste, drive my decisions, move me to making decisions that are going to be harmful to me. So the next one is spiritual. So Oh, you’re gonna go having nothing? You’re nothing no, with the spiritual.

Jeff East
Alright. So that means I have to go to church.

Eric Pennington
No. I am Speaking of First and foremost, it could mean it could mean that Yes, I did. So I digress. It could mean you need to go to church. But it might not mean that as well. I’m talking about the spiritual that really applies to like, for example, we’ve talked many times on episodes here, the the CQ, spiritual emotional intelligence, we’re talking about the core, your personhood, who you are, at its deepest level, right. And, like the physical and the other, the other two that we’re going to talk about, it needs the same kind of good decision making as well. It needs to be taken care of. Now, we’ve lived in a culture where we’ve kind of swung the pendulum right too far. You know, if you go into a corporate america setting and talk about spiritual, you might have somebody holding up, you know, or like showing you the door. You know, exactly if we go into the religious community, and we talk about spiritual in the terms of not being about attending a service or Doing some religious you know, some liturgy or whatever, it can be the same show you the door. I firmly believe in my own walk my spiritual walk. Yeah, it does have to do with God. It does have to do with Jesus and, and that kind of thing. But I’m not here to preach and I’m not here to convert, I’m here to help you understand and to begin taking a look at it because quite frankly, Jeff, I think we’re at a place now in our culture, where we just don’t pay attention to it

Jeff East
at all.

Eric Pennington
Right? And I think that was one of the motivations for us creating that product was to bring attention, right? This idea of who you are at your core, who you are with the people around you who you are with the world at large, and the universe, right and how disconnected or connected you are to those things. Exactly, exactly. So as with the physical, it’s a decision making process. How much time are you spending on you? You know, I know at some point, Jeff, someone’s gonna say you guys are always lamenting on how people aren’t willing to work on this. But maybe we need to Continue banging that gong until we can start seeing that change a bit. Right? Well,

Jeff East
I think I’m speaking for myself, and I think you’ll probably agree. We’ve seen the results when we don’t.

Eric Pennington
Yeah. Yeah. And that’s that’s maybe the irony of modern man, right, is that we’ve seen the results. We This is not new territory know, one of the best pieces of advice I got recently around the spiritual was this idea of space and pace. And how he described it to me was space, is how much am I allowing in my life to dedicate to the spiritual? Is it 10 minutes? Is it 15 minutes? Is it 30 minutes? What practices happened in that timeframe? What time am I dedicating to sort of and we’ve heard this term before unplug, so that we can deliberately and I’m not talking about an obsession about always being about you, always being about what you want, and always being About, that’s not my point. We’re doing this to be healthy to have that balance. Right. And the pace part has to do with the culture, the world we live in. I don’t see the world slowing down anytime soon, Jeff. No, I don’t. I really don’t. I think we’ve kind of hit the tipping point when it comes to the information overload. I think unless we make conscious decisions, again, I plug that to say, Okay, I get it. I probably do have 15 emails, and it’s only 730 in the morning. But I’m not going to look at those emails for the next 15 to 20 minutes because I’m dedicating it to the space I’m dedicating right. To the spiritual.

Jeff East
You know, I was, you know, I grew up on a farm out in the country. So growing up, watching a sunset or watching a sunrise. Sometimes both in the same day was was a big part of your life. You just did it. And I was thinking, when was the last time I actually sat and watched a whole sunrise or a whole sunset? You know, just sit and watch it and enjoy it.

Eric Pennington
Yeah. Yeah. Well, one thing that and it’s been tougher probably in the frame of the last two years for me, but I’m, for lack of a better way of saying it. I’ve made it a conscious decision. We have a lilac tree, maybe it’s maybe a bush, and of course, blooms in spring, typically around I think may is it’s a window of time. And I love the smell of lilac. And I’ve made it a habit that when those things bloom, I am going to stop every time it’s right near our garage. So when I pull in, I get out of my car, and I go outside before I go inside, and I just put my nose to that and I just take a very deep breath. Now, I’m not going to win any awards for that, Jeff and nobody should be clapping and applause That I’m doing it. But that’s a part of the deal. It’s the part of the deal of understanding that, in the end,

Eric Pennington
I’m not really involved in the kind of things that require me to miss that opportunity. You’re not involved in something that should require you to miss a sunset or a sunrise. We’re the ones that kind of like, bought into this idea that my 50 things on my to do list are a matter of life and death matter of

Jeff East
you know, earth and sun or what have you. One of the things that I’ve been really working on is to spend 15 minutes playing with my dog.

Jeff East
just totally paying attention to her playing ball with her or tug of war or whatever. And the days that I do that seems so much better.

Eric Pennington
Yeah. And Jeff, that’s to me, that’s spiritual. That’s paying attention to the spiritual bet your core. That’s the something that makes you come alive. It gives you energy that’s What I’m talking about, and again, I’m not going to deny anyone’s faith practice. And maybe in addition to that 15 minutes with your dog you spend 15 minutes praying and and and, and reading the Bible or reading whatever book that’s important to you. But it’s spending the time that the issue is, as it is with the physical

Jeff East
is that oftentimes we don’t get around to that, you know, and I’m I’m when I’m doing that with her, I’m almost envious because I wish I could be as present as she is.

Eric Pennington
And that could be a whole episode. I know, which we may have to do that, because that’s really, really good. So the mental, sometimes you hear mental and emotional kind of lumped together but I wanted to for the purposes of this, I just recently went through a mental first aid course. And it’s designed the very same way, if you will, that physical first aid that you might have with Red Cross or some agency of such It’s all about mental wealth, mental well being. Sorry.

Jeff East
And I like that mental wealth.

Eric Pennington
I should keep that. Brad, you caught it. Keep that in the show. And it was a class and we went through exercises, you know, recognizing people who are in desperate straits to recognize and people that maybe just need some encouragement, but focusing on on the mental well being side, and it was such a, such a, such a great class learned a lot. And in America, I think most people would agree we’ve stigmatized mental health issues, whether they’re the clinical variety, whether they’re, you know, even I think, I think anytime you sometimes when people say I’m feeling depressed, and even they haven’t been diagnosed, it does kind of make people shrink away. Now the irony of this Jeff is on two fronts. Everyone has, at some point dealt with issues because your brain is a part of your body. That would be like me saying, I’ve never had an ache.I’ve never had a moment in time when a muscle contracts it. You say you’re lying Eric Of course you have. But what do we do? We try to pretend like, Oh, no, no, no, I Oh boy, Jeff, I’ve never had to see a psychologist.

Jeff East
Or we do what my old wrestling coach would say. Walk it off.

Eric Pennington
Yeah. And that leads to my next thing. We have come to a place I believe where I guess the best way to describe it is Jeff if in our studio here today if I got up to leave with you after the show, and I tripped on the stairs and I fell down I had a giant gash on the side of my head and I’m bleeding. Jeff, would you say to me, Eric, that’s some nice looking blood, man. I’ve really liked the color it accent your glasses, and I’ll see you next week. No,

Jeff East
what are you going to do? Probably not. What are you going to do? I’m going to do what I can to give you first aid. Or to maybe call somebody, then you might 911 or something. Yeah, that makes sense. Yeah, handle it better than I can, right?

Eric Pennington
Because this is not something Jeff, you’re not going to pull out the sutures and your scalpel and start working on the right.

Jeff East
No, I might, why not some paper towels and hold it against your head

Eric Pennington
right until somebody else can come and it’s crazy. I know we’re taking it to it. Yeah. Well, why isn’t that the case with our mental our brain? That’s, that’s the that’s the part here and I really, I want the audience to and wherever you may be on that spectrum, right, wherever you may be and where you may land if you know you Need help make a decision to get that help. And again, it may be clinical, it may be starting by talking to a friend or maybe you hire a coach or something. But don’t ignore this because for the same reason, if you ignore the spiritual and the physical, it’s the same thing with the mental

Jeff East
note in in my previous career when I would go into an account, I always went in with the thought of holistic, looking at the whole picture. And that’s what you’re talking about. We need to look at ourselves holistically. Yeah,

Eric Pennington
yeah. And this is not a surprise to people who’ve known me and have maybe read, you know, things I’ve written before. Whether book or blog. I think that this is the this is the part that’s tripping us up. We are not focusing on the whole. Again, we’re taking a look at something we just kind of made this joke about it. But our mental health is stigmatized. It’s one of those things that we try to ignore, or in your case with your wrestling code. I’ll just walk it off. Just Walk it off.

Jeff East
There’s there’s a lot of people that are limping right now.

Eric Pennington
Yeah, you know, and I and I said in a previous episode, you’re worth this work, you’re worth picking up the phone and calling, whether it’s a hotline or whether it’s making that appointment that you’ve been putting off, you’re worth it. Because think of how much better Your life will be. Think about think about that. Think about how much better the lives of those who care about you will be

Jeff East
Yeah, that’s an important thing when we’re doing these things. The other for ourselves, you know, you said three and there’s another one that you’re going to work on but if the effect that you have one the other people yeah, makes it all worthwhile.

Eric Pennington
Yeah. So the emotional this one probably, Jeff, we don’t need to spend a ton of time on only because it’s really the essence of what we we work in day in and day out. You know, it’s our it’s our our mission. However, I think the decision making process here is vitally important. It’s kind of the essence of the meaning of emotional intelligence. Because, remember, you know, emotions are communicators, you know, their neuro transmitters, information, yeah, it’s, it’s designed to give you information. And it’s not information for you to feel embarrassed or shamed or to, you know, to feel superior, whatever it may be. It’s designed to give you some information in that moment in time so that you can make a good decision and a better decision if you let it. And and we’ve used these examples, you know, what do you do when you’re cut off in traffic? And the emotion of anger comes? Well, instead of reacting to the anger there’s the opportunity Well, okay, let me let me pause here.

Jeff East
What is this all about? And and you might even be Miss I don’t miss diagnosing or miss identifying the emotion that anger and might actually be fear because you thought you’re going to get in a wreck. Yeah, exactly. And you would handle that completely different than being angry at the person. So yeah, I see where you’re saying what you’re saying.

Eric Pennington
Well, Jeff, the part that I would, you know, we’re going to get into this as we get to the end of the episode, you know, with a special New Year offer, I think this one is vitally important to is understanding. Okay, where are you at with your emotional intelligence? How are you leveraging that? That, quite frankly, helps those other three become even better?

Jeff East
Exactly. You just kind of set this up. So what exactly can EQ do to help us to look at ourselves holistically to look at ourselves to make better decisions?

Eric Pennington
Well, again, I know I know, we’re in the window of time when people are doing that, where they’re making plans, they’re setting goals, maybe they made some resolutions and those kind of things, and those are all good. However, I oftentimes think you know, in my life, my worst enemy or the thing that tripped me up the most Jeff, was me. It was me responding in anger. When I Sort of chosen a different approach. It was me not being empathetic when that was what was called for, either for myself,

Jeff East
or for other people. And I daresay that’s probably most of us.

Eric Pennington
Yeah. Right. So I could just say, I’m a really good guy and I treat people really nicely and don’t do anything about it. But I felt like when it comes down to it, I want to be better at it. I want to I want to I don’t want it to just be this thing. I can ride on natural talent. You know, they say this about sports teams, I should say athletes, you know, there’s a difference between the elite and the good, right? The Elite ones are not Yes, they have talent coming out of their ears. But they typically very emotionally intelligent, very high IQ when it comes to their particular sport. And that just doesn’t happen naturally. It has to be worked on if you go

Jeff East
back and look at a number one draft choice in the NFL. How many of those professional fans Yeah, yeah, I’m a Bengals fan, I can name you several

Eric Pennington
vets. You know, one thing that comes to mind is in tennis is Roger Federer. I mean, there’s a gentleman who, quite frankly, I think many thought he should have been done years ago. But you know, this guy believes in rest. And it’s, it’s worth a look up to see his story. He has understood his body. And he treats it in such a way that he leverages his rest. So I guess what we’re talking about, Jeff is again, when we look at the definition of emotional intelligence, my case using it as managing my thoughts and my emotions to make optimal better decisions. So could it be that I need rest? Could it be that I need to carve out space Could it be all those things we talked previously? One of the beauties of our tools is that we look at competencies and we’ve discussed Those in previous episodes, which I highly recommend it if you want to go back and look at some of our previous episodes, to learn about those competencies, those are huge.

And I think in a previous episode, you were talking about the photography thing. And maybe this is an upcoming I’m losing track. But one of the things that that stood out to me, I was giving you this example, and I’m going, it is this blending. It’s like, okay, here’s where I need to use recognizing patterns. Here’s where Oh, wow, consequential thinking, combined with my emotional literacy. And it know, it doesn’t happen overnight. It’s not like you look at the competencies and then flip a switch, and then automatically in every situation, it always goes away. It’s not that at all. But with practice in work, which is the next thing I’m going to talk about, it can become a part of what you do, right. Great example. I’m going to talk about the work. All right, because this is this is the part that trips people up, right because they go well. It’s almost like the Google thing. You know what I want to be able to put it in and get an answer in like five seconds. Hmm, Google has done some really cool things. One of the things is not so cool is that emotional intelligence and growing it to a great practitioner level does not happen

Jeff East
overnight. You know, I’m old enough that if when I had to do a term paper when I was in school, yep, I had to go to the library. And I had to invest some time. Yeah, you know, searching through a card catalog or, you know, going through books or whatever, to get the information I had. I had to put the work in to do that. And I think if when you put the work in, you start owning what you’re doing. Now, I think if you just googled it, you know, I think they even have some programs now where you could Google a term paper, and it’ll change it enough where, you know, how much work is that person putting into that term paper? are they learning anything for what they did?

Eric Pennington
Yeah. And and, you know, is a great example from the work perspective because Again, we’ve talked about it, it doesn’t require you to take on the whole mountain today. It doesn’t. There’s a wonderful book and I don’t remember the author’s last name, but the name of the book is called Bird by Bird. Okay. And it’s premise or it’s designed for writers to help you be a better writer. Okay, so I’ve been reading it, my wife bought it for me a surprise gift a couple months ago, and it’s really, really well done book, but where that title came from

the author’s dad and what I guess it would have made her brother had procrastinated and writing a paper at school, and it was around birds that was subject he had picked, and it was all these different species. And there was a lot of species that he was going to write on, but he made the mistake. He procrastinated, oh my goodness, this is due in two days type thing. And he began to stress because he had a lot of species to identify and frustration, all the things that you can imagine.And her dad in a very loving, caring grace way, came up to him, put his hand on his shoulder and said, I forget her brother’s name. So in this case, son, it’s Bird by Bird, by Bird by Bird. And that illustration, right, is that it’s not 30 different birds now, right? It’s Bird by Bird. And that’s to me the work of emotional intelligence. It’s one step. It’s one competency. It’s one course it’s step, step, step and step. And I know in my own life, and I think you would agree, Jeff,

Jeff East
you will see results. Exactly. You don’t become the champion of whatever you’re doing overnight. Even those people you talked about earlier, these these athletes that are Exceptional athletes, they just you know, you don’t walk on to a college football field. Yeah. No matter how good an athlete you are, you’ll get hurt really bad. You know, unless you put that work in one way or the other.

Eric Pennington
Yeah. And and to be sure, Jeff, I’ll go back to it. You should feel that you’re worth the work. That’s key.

Eric Pennington
So everyone out there hear me clearly, you’re worth this work. Exactly. I don’t think many of you out there thinking that you’re going to become something unbelievable and off the charts and rock star tomorrow. But the idea maybe of making a change and the idea of making the decision to go in a different direction, and maybe one of those four areas for example, it might seem daunting, but again, I just, you know, kind of alluding to that analogy, in Bird by Bird, Burgess bird, just one at a time. Take small step. And keep at it, another step. Keep at it, those things will happen. Up to a lot of success. So as we come to an end, Jeff, I kind of wanted to talk a little bit about how spirit of EQ can help practically, the podcast is a great tool, and we’ve got a lot of content. And I’ve been thinking about it that maybe want to let our audience know some on purpose ways that they can kind of expand that out. Okay. And I’m sure they’ve been a number of people that have looked at our website. And you know, they’ve, they’ve heard us mentioned things from time to time, but want to be a little bit more on purpose about our approach. We work with individuals, and we also work with organizations be they profit or nonprofit, we’re not cookie cutter, we don’t prescribe and put you into a box and say, This is what you get, and this is what you get. We work with you first to find out where you’re at and what your need is, what problem are you trying to solve? And by doing that, then we can kind of tell you what you might want to consider to help you

Jeff East
right and that that goes the same for corporations or businesses. Yeah,

Eric Pennington
absolutely. Absolutely. Be Is it the same philosophy applies? Our tools are online and in person. One of the things I think is most powerful about what we do, Jeff is that we come alongside of people in organizations. It’s not a, take the assessment and good luck. We value this work in such a way that we want to move you to that change that you want. You know, that while you’re making those efforts, while you’re putting in the work, you’ve got support, you’ve taken that first step we want to be there with. Yeah, exactly. And quite frankly, I you know, Jeff, and I think this kind of conveys your sentiments. I didn’t want to do this kind of work without that. Mm hmm.

Eric Pennington
I mean, it’s just not very interesting to just dispense and leave. Yeah. And

Jeff East
I think a lot of times when when, whatever the program is, when that happens, you usually end up doing more harm than you did good anyway.

Eric Pennington
Yeah. Yeah. In the end, in the end, and this is, you know, highly personal, my in the course I’ve known you For a bit, Jeff, so I don’t think this is going to be strange, and you probably share some of it. The reasons why we’re doing this, I really firmly believe that the work the the core of emotional intelligence is is vital to having a healthy and meaningful life. I agree. I think it’s vital. And I really, really, I hate seeing people who are stuck. I hate seeing people who are spinning their wheels, like on ice on an on a cold day, right? And though I can’t make you do anything, and I don’t have silver bullets to fix it in a moment, we have the kind of things that can legitimately help them. And I want to do that. And another part of that is Jeff, I’ve seen people who haven’t done it, and they’ve come to the end of their days, and they never did. And that’s really tragic. So if you and I Right, if there’s somebody out there listening somewhere in the US or Europe or Middle East Asia, and they go, Wow, that analogy about the Bird by Bird, that makes total sense to me. I get that. And they began to turn, Jeff, that’s makes this rewarding.

Jeff East
You know, I think, for me, you know, we mentioned the competencies, and you mentioned a couple of them, but for me, the key is the one that’s called pursuing noble goal. Hmm, yeah. And I think which basically, the noble goal is what is it that really makes you who you are? What is it that makes you get up in the morning and do the things you do? It’s not about how much money you’ve made or anything like that. When I’ve helped someone find their noble goal and I see how now their life is taken maybe a little bit different direction or what their same direction but they’re doing it with different purpose. I know, my noble goal did that for me. And that’s what you’re saying. When we have this, I hate his word product,

Jeff East
but whatever it is whatever you want to call it, yeah, that can help people. That’s what we want to do.

Eric Pennington
Yeah, and this is the this is the mode. One of the things that we’re offering I mentioned earlier, Jeff, we were going to have a special in January. We are giving $100 off of our, we call it the SEI EQ Assessment, that’s our full emotional intelligence assessment. And that includes a debrief as a listener, what you would need to do is to send us an email at info at spirit of EQ, and you want to put in the subject line, podcast offer. And then if you want to write in the body, hey, I listened to the episode I can’t, you know, whatever you want to do there if you want to put you know, I listened to this episode and I’m interested in getting one of those assessments and a debrief and we have all kinds of techniques. To be able to do this from afar, too, it’s not like you have to be in our neck of the woods to do it. And this offer will go through the month of January. And I really hope you’ll take advantage of it because it’s a great tool to assess where you’re at to measure your, your competencies. There’s some things on success factors, if I remember

Eric Pennington
Yes, exactly. There’s all kinds of ways and this would be our contribution to you and getting you started off well in 2020. So take advantage of that. Of course, if you have questions, for whatever reason that email will work the same. You can address it to me or to Jeff, it doesn’t matter. But we really hope you will. And with that, Jeff, I think we’ve come to the end of this episode. It’s great to see you as always.

Jeff East
I hope everybody’s New Year is starting off. Great. Thank you for listening.

Eric Pennington
Yeah, take care.

 


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